Youth Violence Prevention and Human Trafficking

Initiative 3

Youth Violence Prevention and Human Trafficking

Defend the cause of the weak and fatherless; maintain the rights of the poor and oppressed. – PSALM 82:3

You may choose to look the other way, but you can never again say you did not know. – William Wilberforce.

 Trinity Health Foundation of East Tennessee extends the healing ministry of Jesus by improving the physical, emotional, and spiritual health of our community.

Envisioned Goal

Youth Violence Prevention: Our youth are our future – for our region, state, and nation. Unfortunately, our area youth experience violence against themselves, with gang activity prevalent in our region. We seek efforts to reduce youth violence as measured in reduced injuries, deaths, and crimes committed by and against our youth.

Human Trafficking: Elimination of rapes and abductions in our region is the goal, but we do not have the statistics to measure the extent of the problem. Trinity seeks projects to reduce the prevalence of human trafficking of our youth in our community.

Background

In a revealing sociological study, a large percentage of Americans report having shrinking networks and fewer relationships. Nearly fifty percent of our population report feelings of loneliness, isolation, and lack of interaction with others, as noted in Robert Putnam's book, Bowling Alone. Trinity seeks proposals that will encourage relationships to be grown in the community (define community in the broadest sense that meets your organization's expertise – family, church, neighborhood, etc.). How do we connect people to people? Healthy relationships may be the most significant anecdote to addiction. Ideas from green space enhancement, community clubs for purposeful neighborhood interaction, community school family interaction, and church neighborhood outreach are examples of the general areas that would be of interest under this initiative.

Examples of Specific Initiatives

This topic is new for Trinity to invest in, and as such, we have no preconceived notions of success.  We know we have a problem, and we want to address specifically those efforts that will reduce violence against youth in any of its forms, but we do not want to limit your creative opportunities.  The need is great, and the method to address these needs are myriad, but no one approach fits all communities or situational requirements.  We look to our many partnering organizations to propose with passion their ideas that have not been possible because of a lack of startup funding resources.

Initiative 2

Neighborhood/ Community Strengthening

THE NEIGHBORHOOD IS THE CORNERSTONE OF OUR COMMUNITY

“Shared friendship doubles our joy and halves our sorrows.”
-Swedish Proverb

“In neighborhoods without a usable park or playground, the incidence of childhood obesity increases by 29 percent.”
-Darell Hammond

Trinity Health Foundation of East Tennessee extends the healing ministry of Jesus by improving the physical, emotional, and spiritual health of our community.

Envisioned Goal

Trinity seeks partners that can implement programs that will measurably strengthen neighborhoods in our community. Health begins at home, and our neighborhoods are the first network outside the home. By positively and significantly impacting neighborhood interaction, the isolation that can lead to addiction could be reduced. We seek creative proposals drawn from experience, other cities, or innovative ideas that will measurably support and encourage healthy neighborhood networking. The goal is to actively connect people to the folks who live in close proximity to the families down the street.

Background

In a revealing sociological study, a large percentage of Americans report having shrinking networks and fewer relationships. Nearly fifty percent of our population report feelings of loneliness, isolation, and lack of interaction with others, as noted in Robert Putnam's book, Bowling Alone. Trinity seeks proposals that will encourage relationships to be grown in the community (define community in the broadest sense that meets your organization's expertise – family, church, neighborhood, etc.). How do we connect people to people? Healthy relationships may be the most significant anecdote to addiction. Ideas from green space enhancement, community clubs for purposeful neighborhood interaction, community school family interaction, and church neighborhood outreach are examples of the general areas that would be of interest under this initiative.

Examples of Specific Initiatives

  1. Neighborhood Crossfit: Proposed projects for the development of activities that get people out of their homes and interacting face to face regularly would be valuable to our community as well as individual health – a twofer.
  2. Clearinghouse for Communities/Support Groups: Innovative ways to connect people to activities and support groups are sought (citywide neighborhood online bulletin boards, local networking of special interest groups, alternatives like Neighborhood Watch for other group purposes, etc.). Projects that encourage neighbors to interact face-to-face are sought.
  3. Neighborhood Green Space: Proposed projects to improve neighborhood parks and greenways to create inviting spaces for people to interact and be active. Creative conversions of infrequently used neighborhood assets (aging tennis courts, vacant fields, etc.) into actively filled new venues (pickleball, Frisbee golf, etc.)
  4. Neighborhood Prayer Initiative: Proposed projects that create and systematically expand neighborhood prayer networks to get neighbors in contact would bring value to our community.
  5. Other Ideas to Strengthen the Neighborhood: Neighbors are isolated. The relationship process begins with knowing each other. We seek projects that have shown promise in different locations to reinvigorate neighborhood relationships from the smallest unit (the family) to the largest region (the city). The revitalization of Market Square is a great success story and example for other parts of our community.

Download Initiative 3 Proposal Details

Files are in PDF format. These files contain information about the intent of the topic, the general grant philosophy, and the approach of Trinity.
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